Harrie Fasher

lines: power of the landscape

Harrie Fasher

Artstate Museum Residency Projects

As a part of Artstate Bathurst, three projects were commissioned from artists-in-residence at three of Bathurst’s museums; the Australian Fossil and Mineral Museum, the Chifley Home and the National Motor Racing Museum. Artists were asked to create new work in response to these museums and their collections. As part of Artstate Bathurst, all registered delegates will have free entry to participating museums on presentation of their delegate’s lanyard.

Harrie Fasher’s residency at the Australian Fossil and Mineral Museum has created the space for her to explore the life force within the landscape and her connection to it. The earth has an inherent power, and Indigenous cultures have generally centred around an intimate relationship with this energy.

The materials used in the installation are varied; wood, bone and stone gathered from the landscape is directly juxtaposed against industrial steel and bronze, and supported by manmade rope and canvas. The installation requires the audience’ engagement and provides a visceral body experience, whilst a small suite of etchings and drawings provides a more intimate dialogue.

Living in a rural landscape revolves around community, and the making of this work is no different. Fasher’s studio team will construct the installation and local print maker Victoria Tuson will be engaged in the production of a series of etchings. Workshops involving youth from Skillset, Kelso and Bathurst High will also provide parallel explorations.

Harrie Fasher is a recipient of the Helen Lempriere Scholarship in 2017 and Sculpture by the Sea’s Rio Tinto Award at Cottesloe 2018. She is currently exhibiting a new body of work Studies in Bronze and Steel at Sydney’s King Street Gallery on William, and in the touring exhibition Salient; Contemporary artists at the Western Front. Alongside these exhibitions Fasher is working on local projects including a residency for Artstate Bathurst; lines whisper: power of the landscape, and a collaboration with Lingua Franca; Mighty.

Working from a studio in Oberon, NSW, she produces large scale steel sculptures that embody tension and movement. Fasher utilises both abstraction and figurative form, predominately the horse, to convey her message. Working with steel as her primary medium, the sculptures are three dimensional drawings that illicit an emotional response from the viewer.

The mental and physical power of the horse is core to Fasher’s work, and belies her history as an equestrian athlete. Her sculptures display an innate knowledge of the physical and gestural nuances of the horse, and the unique bond between horse and human.

Fasher has work in public and private collections both within Australia and internationally. She has an extensive exhibition history, including a seminal sculpture central to the National Museum of Australia’s Spirited: Australia’s Horse Story exhibition in 2014. Critical acclaim, appointment to the National Art School’s teaching staff, and numerous scholarships and residencies reiterate the strength and vitality of Fasher’s work and the continued development of her creative practice.